SCHLAYER, Jacob
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Jacob F. Schlayer (Schlehr)

SCHLAYER (Schlehr), Jacob F., contractor, was born in Harrisburg, Pa., January 17, 1837. He is a son of the late Jacob Frederick and Elizabeth Maria (Beckley) Schlehr. Jacob Frederick Schlehr was born in the town of Ringlinge, Baden, Germany. For many years he was engaged in farming. In 1832 he emigrated with his family to America. The passage across the ocean in a sailing vessel occupied sixty-eight days. The reached Baltimore, Md., September 4, 1832. A few days later he procured a team and wagon to transport his family and household goods to Harrisburg. In two days they reached York, Pa., where they rested one day and procured another team. Harrisburg was reached a day or two later, with no mishap save the occasional upsetting of the wagon. The remainder of their lives was passed in Harrisburg. They were well-known and honored residents. The father died April 27, 1837. He was married in Baden, Germany, to Elizabeth Maria Bickley; she died May 2, 1876. They had nine children: Barbara, born in Ringlinge, Baden, widow of the late Leonard Orth, residing in Harrisburg; William, born in Ringlinge, October 12, 1823, a continuous resident of Harrisburg for sixty-two years, still actively engaged, in his seventy-second year, at his trade of shoemaking; he was married at Linglestown, Dauphin county, February 5, 1855, to Catherine, daughter of the late Frederick Lenhart, has five living children, Mary, wife of John Murphy, Louisa, wife of Robert Wallace, William H., Edward, and Emma; Caroline, deceased, born in Ringlinge, Germany; Bernhardt, whose present residence is unknown; Caroline, born in Ringlinge, wife of Henry Langenberg, of Beverley, Washington county, Ohio; Andrew, born in Ringlinge, died in 1893; Mary, born at sea, deceased; Margaret, born in Harrisburg, wife of Rev. Henry Fossler, of Brooklyn, N. Y.; and Jacob Frederick.

Jacob Frederick Schlehr received only a limited education in the schools of Harrisburg. At the age of twelve he began the battle of life for himself. For two years he was a driver on the canal. The next year he was clerk in the grocery store of Christ. Henry, on Market street. At the age of fifteen he was apprenticed to the house carpenter trade with Colestock & Garverich. This firm failed in business after two years and a half, and he was compelled to seek other employers. He then served an apprenticeship of two and a half years with Holman & Simonds, making a completed apprenticeship of four years. His pay during the entire period was fifty cents a day, out of which he had to pay all his living expenses, including board and clothing. He now removed to Beverly, Ohio, and worked at carpentry for four months, returning after that to Harrisburg. Here he followed his trade and also conducted a dairy business. In the spring of 1863 he abandoned the trade to devote his entire attention to the dairy. In the spring of 1865 he engaged in the sand business and in 1866 sold the dairy and has since been interested in sand. Since 1886 he has also been engaged in contracting. He was married in Harrisburg, by Rev. Dr. Hay, January 16, 1859, to Anna Mary, daughter of William and Hannah (Worrall) Willis, both deceased. Their children are: William Henry, in the plumbing business, Harrisburg, and Hannah Elizabeth, wife of Henry Boyer. Mr. Schlayer has been for twenty-five years an active member of Robert Burns Lodge, No. 464, and of Perseverance Chapter, No. 21, F. & A. M. He also belongs to Phoenix Lodge, K. of P., and of the United Workmen. Since the war of the Rebellion he has been a Republican; he was previously a Democrat. He and his family attend Zion Evangelical Lutheran church, of which Mrs. Schlayer is a consistent member.

 

 

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Transcribed by Marjorie Tittle - rtittle@wf.net, for the Dauphin County, Pennsylvania Genealogy Transcription Project - http://maley.net/transcription. 30 Oct 2000 Copyright 2000 - All Rights Reserved; Use, duplication or reproduction for profit or presentation by any person or organization is strictly prohibited.