DEISS, Wm.
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DEISS, WILLIAM, pharmacist, was born in the province of Waldeck, Germany, February 16, 1844. He is a son of Andrew and Elizabeth (Knipple) Deiss, both natives of Germany and both now deceased. He was reared to manhood in his native land. He received the advantages of both a public school and a collegiate education. After leaving the schools he traveled extensively throughout Germany, Switzerland and France. In 1870, at the beginning of the Franco-Prussian war, he became attached to the German army in the capacity of a member of the Red Cross corps, and served therein until the close of the war in March, 1871. He then returned to his home, where he remained for two years. In 1872 he left Germany and came to America, taking up his residence with his brother, Daniel Deiss, at Columbus, Ohio, and with him learned the drug business. After the death of his brother in 1876 he became manager of this business until the business was sold out. In February, 1877, he removed to Harrisburg and engaged in the drug business with William Keller, under the firm name of Keller & Deiss. This partnership was dissolved in October of the same year. In the following December Mr. Deiss took charge of the hospital dispensary, in the performance of the duties of which position he rendered supreme satisfaction until the close of his term of office in 1890. On June 1, 1891, he purchased his present business from Ira Lott. He was married at Harrisburg, October 2, 1881, to Mary Bonacker, a native of Harrisburg and of German ancestry. Two children have been born to them: Anna E. and Mina J. In political views Mr. Deiss is an independent Democrat. The family attend the Lutheran church.

 

Historical Review of Dauphin County

Transcribed by Donna Whipple Dwhip79307@aol.com for The Dauphin County, Pennsylvania Genealogy Transcription Project-http://maley.net/transcription.

Date of Transcription: 1 Jan 2001

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